Tag Archives: david fincher

The Girl with No IKEA Furniture

A little known fact, like the Coen Bros’ Fargo not being based on a true story as stated in the opening credits, David Fincher’s The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo is based on the bestselling international novel published posthumously by Steig Larsson, of which a Swedish movie version was already made in 2009. To draw comparisons to both would likely cause the reader to become confused and futile. So I’ll just stick with this movie at hand and review it on it’s own fucking terms! I mean nobody gives a hoot about how the numerous movie versions bastardized the novels like Great Expectations, The Great Gatsby, or A Christmas Carol and yet I feel that this movie is being scrutinized with higher standards – the ironic thing being that the novel with that ugly neon yellow cover really does suck to start. Keeping all that in mind I came out placing it in this year’s number two spot.

And it’s Fincher’s shooting and editing style that raises this silly sordid plot that is mired in well worn cliches and twists but still maintains a panache for the mystery thriller genre. Plus the fact that Daniel Craig and Rooney Mara make a very riveting dynamic duo investigating the disappearance of a girl 36 years ago from a secluded island of a dysfunctional Nazi sympathizing family filled with dark secrets. But what is not a secret is that Rooney Mara really did get her nipples pierced for the role because at every press junket some dimwitted so called “journalist” first question is about this. Sorta like how they all ask Tom Cruise if he does his own stunts.

From the opening James Bond credits through the grotesque rape scenes that seem to have all the critics in a tizzy, I was completely mesmerized in the Blow Up photo mystery, drawing me deeper into an obsidian oblivion only to later discover that Swedes just have a fondness for incest molestation and extreme abuse I guess. Maybe if they had Blu Ray on their island they could just watch Fincher movies instead of having to get off themselves. But as much as I enjoyed the movie I just don’t think I could stomach a sequel, let alone a trilogy, even if David is in the directors chair again because personally I found the dragon tattoo gal a bit too implausible to sustain my interest and as disposable as H&M’s cheap ass clothes.


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December 25, 2011 · 8:17 pm

2010 “Epic” 5

1. The Social Network

2. Toy Story 3

3. True Grit

4.  The Fighter

5. The Runaways/Scott Pilgrim vs The World

 

Noteworthy:


Sylvian Chomet follows The Triplets of Belleville with The Illusionist – another marriage of traditional animation and music from the Frenchies reminding us Americans the standard format that 3D and CGI have become, thereby losing it’s poetic sensibilities and abstract qualities. But the Illusionist’s “epic fail” is in it’s focus on the least interesting characters as opposed to washed up vaudeville acts such as a suicidal clown, a lonely ventriloquist, midget concierges, acrobatic painters,  hybrid late 50’s band and a nippy bunny.

Toy Story 3‘s main characters’ relationship to the audience may already have been established but are still always developing as opposed to this Magician who still can’t draw a crowd or a dingy dimwitted materialistic ungrateful Bitch.

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Honestabel Likes The Social Network.

Director David Fincher jokingly dubbed The Social Network, “the Citizen Kane of John Hughes movies.” Both about the the rise of a young controversial media tycoons that refused to participate in the movie about them, both incapable of friendship, and both have enemies that want to see him fall. But as for the John Hughes analogy, I hope Fincher don’drop dead on the mean streets of New York.

The movie begins with a scene in a bar near Harvard campus in 2003 with Mark Zuckerberg (Jesse Eisenberg) on verge of being inspired in launching Facebook and getting dumped by his girlfriend, Erica (Rooney Mara). We immediately get a sense of what makes Zuckerberg tick, his insecurities, ambitions, and ego provided by the script from Aaron Sorkin that is a shoe in for an Oscar. The scene exemplifies the tempo and style of the movie with a barrage of dialogue of subtle insinuations, misinterpretations, miscommunications and accusations of speaking in code and ends with it’s thematic line “because you’re an asshole.” In Citizen Kane, his bestfriend says, “He never gave himself away. He never gave anything away, he just left you a tip.” And like Kane, Zuckerberg did just that – though he may have tipped his hand with obvious damage control with his timely $100 mill donation to the Lebowski Urban Achievers in Newark, NJ. I wonder what Zuckerberg will say on his deathbed….Row crew?
Zuckerburg may have stole Facebook but I don’t see him throwing a tantrum over Twitter, which I believe he invented with the Status Update/News Feed. What I’m still trying to figure out is how a guy with no friends or ads found 500 million of them when we can’t even get one lousy subscriber. Even with a Facebook page (LIKE IT), stickers, or buttons, and divided shares. But Zuckerberg is not even half the backstabbing asshole compared to what Jay Leno did to Conan who now resides in the bargain basement of networks TBS with a beard considering he only got 32.5 mill whereas Eduardo Saverin (Andrew Garfield), co-creator of Facebook, is worth at the age of 26, 1.3 billion. And isn’t that what we ultimately find fascinating about these tech geeks? Money! Not friendship or loyalty, I mean who’s got time for that besides 500 million users?
(Another Harvard Alumni who got shafted.)

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The Curious Gump of Benjamin Un-Buttoned

The Curious Case of Benjamin Button Baby

“I hope I die before I get old.” – The Who

The only curiosity in question in The Curious Case of Benjamin Button is how filmmakers can adapt a 32 page short story by F. Scott Fitzgerald, about a man who is born old and ages backwards, into an epic 3 hour movie. Perhaps David Fincher, who may be one of the few directors to successfully (unlike Lucas) dazzle and revolutionize Hollywood’s new digital technology, and Eric Roth, who may be sadly responsible for teaching most of us our pop culture history through Forrest Gump, got too caught up in their own acclaimed reputations as they ditch F. Scott’s fable tacking on only his name for credibility and protection from plagiarism as they rewrite the “precious” life of Benjamin Button.

GollumThe Curious Case of Benjamin Button Old

Though Fincher succeeds in a beautiful technically shot fable he fails in constructing a plot with the help of Eric Roth’s famous Gump motifs and overdone flashbacks as we are constantly drawn back to a current day hospital room of some old dying hag reading Benjamin’s diary, who’s voiceover makes Forrest’s sound like a rambling auctioneer’s. With this implementation of reality (along with modern setting of Hurricane Katrina looming) one is drawn away from this quirky fairytale. The film quickly loses F. Scott’s touch as it turns into a rather banal love story of how Old Man Ben (Brad Pitt) and Little Daisy (Cate Blanchett) fall in love and cross paths in the middle of both their aging process so that it’s neither misconstrued as pedophilia or oedipal. But before they finally do shag and settle down on Revolutionary Road we follow Benjamin growing up in New Orleans in the early 20th century, fittingly at an old age home, brought up by his adopted Mother, Queenie (Taraji P. Henson). However this tale doesn’t get going till he goes off to sea on a tugboat (not to catch shrimp) that we are introduced with a new engaging cast of characters. It’s also during this time on shore leave Benjamin takes the old skin boat to tuna town with lonely, Elizabeth Abbot (Tilda Swinton). While this affair is short-lived, Tilda succeeds in playing her first likeable role as an unhappily married woman who senses something of a kindred young spirit in Benjamin as she spoils him with caviar and a nightly nightcap with no strings attached.

The Curious Case of Benjamin Button Brad & Tilda

It’s only when Daisy is reintroduced as some beatnik skanky dancer whose every whim is catered to by Benjamin that Fincher and Roth’s tale turns into a full on drama as F. Scott’s humor of a backwards life from old Pops’ Wingman to a College football Jock raised by his (Benjamin’s) own Son is lost in the adaptation. Cate Blanchett reprises her Kate Hepburn attitude and inflections as she views herself to be the greatest modern day actress (ironically this was all Hepburn had to do as well) but only prevails in looking like an arrogant bitch with too tight of a face. Pitt’s character is also lost as he leaves the love of his life fearing his youth will taint his ability  to act as a father – allowing for the first time his malady to control his life when we all know, as does F. Scott, it would of been cougar Cate’s constant desire to be in the spotlight that would chase Benjamin away. More useless plot time is then used up as Benjamin does some soul searching like Caine in Kung Fu and just walks the earth thereby giving Fincher an excuse to show off pretty images in exotic locations.

The Curious Case of Benjamin Button Travel

 

 

The Curious Case of Benjamin Button Baby

“My Momma always said, “life was like a box of chocolates. You never know what you’re gonna get.”‘ – Forrest Gump

Except in this case we do because in the end the minute you are born you are one day closer to death and this holds true for this story as well so what’s the point? Even in Benjamin’s youth he is plagued with a case of Alzheimer’s but what’s really ironic is hopefully I can skip all that and leave before the final curtain falls in the sanctum of a cozy dark theater, the only refuge in this absurd world – almost like this fellow moviegoer. The Real Curious Case

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